top of page

DHS Struggles to Track Migrants Post-Release, Inspector General Report Reveals



WASHINGTON D.C. – A new report released by the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Inspector General has sounded an alarm on the federal government's ability to track migrants once they are released into the country. This revelation comes amid a marked increase in illegal immigration since President Joe Biden took office.

The study underscores the necessity for DHS to maintain accurate addresses for migrants post-release. Such data is pivotal not just for bureaucratic purposes, but critically for national security. The report was emphatic on this point, stating, "[Immigration and Customs Enforcement] must be able to locate migrants to enforce immigration laws."

The surge in illegal immigration has been palpable, especially in regions like Texas. Roughly 50 Texas counties have declared states of emergency in response to what some are terming an 'invasion.'

Further exacerbating concerns are the 130,000 unaccompanied minors whose whereabouts are currently unknown. Overseen by the Department of Health and Human Services, these children have been placed with sponsors or purported family members. This lack of oversight has not only prompted Florida Governor Ron DeSantis to call for a grand jury investigation but has also led to a congressional probe.

The report's data presents a troubling picture: of the 981,671 migrant records from March 2021 to August 2022, over 177,000 had missing, undeliverable, or non-residential addresses. And the challenges don't end with missing data. The DHS's struggles extend to verifying the authenticity of the addresses they do possess, with reasons ranging from the sheer volume of migrants to limited inter-departmental coordination.

So, What Does This Mean?

The inability of the DHS to accurately track and maintain data on migrants post-release has multifaceted implications. On a national security front, the lack of accurate data poses potential risks. For the migrants, especially unaccompanied minors, there's the danger of falling through the cracks, leading to potential exploitation or abuse. Additionally, from an administrative standpoint, this gap in data accuracy can hinder efficient policy implementation and response to the ongoing immigration challenges. As the U.S. confronts these immigration concerns, refining monitoring and data systems becomes paramount, both for the country's safety and the welfare of the migrants.

332 views13 comments

13 Comments


Unknown member
Sep 13, 2023

They make thing size of button I think Microsoft makes them . You attach them on anything snd you can track on laptop or cellphone !

They come with extended range as well

Like

Unknown member
Sep 12, 2023

Considering what a mess this whole immigration thing is and the horrible way immigrants have been treated, I would probably do the same thing. Not saying it's right or wrong, just that it's been a pretty miserable experience for them.

Like
Unknown member
Sep 13, 2023
Replying to

I’m sure they have gone through he ll but if they make it safely to them it’s true life saver.

Like

Unknown member
Sep 12, 2023

It's a fake crisis, this isn't a historically high level of immigration and the vast majority of migrants show up for their hearings when they're scheduled to do so. ICE not having the ability to harass them before their hearings is honestly a net positive. And if you want to learn the horrifying realities of Texas's "Operation Lonestar" I can put you in touch with some people who have covered it. David Griscom has done some great coverage of that horror show, with special emphasis on how negatively impacted the National Guardsmen in Texas have been by this lengthy political deployment. Servicemembers are being impoverished and a bunch have committed suicide while activated for Operation Lone Star, and the conditions …

Like

Unknown member
Sep 12, 2023

If only Congress -- very much including both parties -- would quintuple the administrative courts and build enough detention facilities for the annual surges. Heck, we could make quite a wall out of all this.

Like
Unknown member
Sep 27, 2023
Replying to

1: Only if they promptly turn themselves in to the first authorities they can.

2: They're also unauthorized entrants, so saving them the cost of housing themselves is a natural duty given their lack of work visas or such.

Like

Unknown member
Sep 12, 2023

What does this have to do with combat news?

Like
Unknown member
Sep 12, 2023
Replying to

Trump can't fix his own mess. Get serious.

Like
bottom of page